Perennials (And People) With a Can-Do Attitude

August 06, 2018 0 Comments

Perennials (And People) With a Can-Do Attitude

Do you think of yourself as someone who goes through life with a CAN-DO attitude?

Or are you more like me—hesitant, unsure and rarely willing to do anything that will jeopardize the dental work? Does it take a lot of mustering up for you to try something tough? Do you struggle to thrive under adverse circumstances? 

I’m surrounded by brothers, sisters and friends with a can-do attitude and I admire them tremendously, even though sometimes I want to say,

CHILL.

My sister has gone through life with a can-do attitude. Don’t tell her she can’t do something. She’ll take on any hike no matter how treacherous and unpredictable. The one experience in which she had to be retrieved by a Search and Rescue team hasn’t altered her daring nature at all. She’s fearless and tough—everything I want to be but my whimpering insides won’t allow it.

Being fearless and tough is what I aspire to be. Only once in a while can I overcome my quaking nerves and do the thing that terrifies me. But I don’t know if I can change my essential inner mouse at this point in my life. After all, I could be one broken hip away from a nursing home if I get up on that ladder! I have carpal tunnel from wringing my hands repeatedly.

It’s not easy being a namby-pamby, what with all these Can-Do folks among my family and friends.

What else in my life has a Can-Do attitude?

When I look out in my garden in the dead of summer here, with the temperatures simmering at 100+, I see what I’d call Can-Do Perennials. Can-do perennials have a lot in common with can-do people: they make the best of less than optimal circumstances and surroundings.

I stand in awe in front of my own Gaillardia, Agastache, Coreopsis and Candytuft, some of the hardiest perennials there are. They’re all heat tolerant, low maintenance and drought-resistant.

If you’re looking for power perennials and tough plants for full sun, you don’t have to look much further.

So, my Design Inspiration today includes the Coreopsis and the Candytuft.

Coreopsis

image of coreopsis

With Coreopsis, also called Tickseed, you’ll get lasting summer color after most perennial flowers have dried up or fallen off. Coreopsis is native to the United States. Their daisy-like flowers are produced from early summer into fall. Coreopsis will attract lots of butterflies and birds to your garden. They make great cut flowers, too.

I have several varieties in my garden, including Curry Up, 'Gold Standard' Tall Tickseed and Dwarf Coreopsis (Coreopsis auriculata 'Nana’). They really brighten up even the dullest of days!

Candytuft (Iberis Sempervirens)

image of candytuft

A European native, this nice mounding plant has adapted to most zones in the US. At 12-18 inches and evergreen, this tough perennial wants to bake in the sun. Flowers are usually white, but some cultivars have blooms in pink or lilac.

The care is simple. After the blooms are dead, cut it back to ground level. You’ll enjoy it tremendously when it returns in the spring, covered with gorgeous flowers.

I love the symmetry and design of each individual flower. Tough and pretty… a great combination!

Can-do people  and can-do perennials--they inspire me! 

Have you ever had an experience in which you conquered your fear and did something that surprised you? Go ahead, share your story!

New Products Featuring Coreopsis and Candytuft

Coreopsis and Buds Pillow Cover - Available in different fabrics and sizes.

Candytuft Midnight Pillow Cover - Available in different fabrics and sizes

image of candytuft pillow

Candytuft Accessory Bag

image of candytuft accessory bag





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